Ethnic Voices Poetry Series


2013-2014 Series

Missouri Arts CouncilPartially supported by funding from the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency.

Books by all poets are available in the University Book Store.

Poets in the 2013-2014 Ethnic Voices Poetry Series will all be interviewed before the audience by “New Letters on the Air” host, Angela Elam. All events are free and open to the public. Please visit the KCPL website to RSVP: http://www.kclibrary.org/events-and-activities


Martín Espada

Espada
Photo Credit: Silvain

Martín Espada has published more than fifteen books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems, The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011), is the recipient of the Milt Kessler Award, a Massachusetts Book Award and an International Latino Book Award. The Republic of Poetry, a collection published by Norton in 2006, received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A previous book of poems, Imagine the Angels of Bread (Norton, 1996), won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other books of poems include A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (Norton, 2000), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (Norton, 1993), and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (Curbstone, 1990).  Additional recognition includes the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.  His work has been widely translated; collections of poems have been published in Spain, Puerto Rico and Chile. A former tenant lawyer, Espada is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

The official website for Martín Espada  http://www.martinespada.net/

October 22, 2013
The Kansas City Public Library
14 W. 10th St. 
Kansas City, MO, 64108

6:00 Reception 
6:30 Reading


Patrick Rosal

Patrick Rosal

Patrick Rosal is the author of three full-length poetry collections, most recently Boneshepherds, honored both by the National Book Critics Circle and the Academy of American Poets as a notable book. His collections have also won the Association of Asian American Studies Book Award, Global Filipino Literary Award and the Asian American Writers Workshop Members' Choice Award. His poetry and prose has been published widely in journals and anthologies including ESPN’s Grantland, Tin House, American Poetry Review, Harvard Review, and Indiana Review. A former Fulbright Fellow, he is currently on the faculty of Rutgers University-Camden's MFA program. 

Read a sample of Patrick Rosal’s work http://www.aprweb.org/poem/delenda-undone

Watch and listen to Patrick Rosal read a poem http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqH8l6zW4gc

November 12, 2013
The Kansas City Public Library
14 W. 10th St. 
Kansas City, MO, 64108

6:00 Reception 
6:30 Reading


Maija Rhee Devine

Maija Rhee Devine, a Korean-born writer whose fiction, non-fiction, and poetry have appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Boulevard, North American Review, and The Kenyon Review, and in various anthologies, holds a B.A. in English from Sogang University in Seoul and an M.A. in English from St. Louis University.  Writing honors include an NEA grant, finalist status in the William Faulkner Creative Writing Competition, James Jones First Novel Fellowship, Emily Dickinson Poetry Award, and nominations for Pushcart Prizes and O. Henry Awards. Her poetry chapbook, Long Walks on Short Days, features poems about Korea, China, the U.S. and other lands she has known. It has been labeled by Vince Gotera, editor of North American Review, “an auspicious poetic debut.”  Gotera states that Devine’s “poems contrast Asia against the US: China and Korea vs. Missouri and Wal-Mart. Her exquisite imagery—the ‘Teak-leaf-lacy-night ... beard grizzled’ of a Chinese beggar, next to the ‘Pink-slipped auto workers’ in Illinois, ‘Biceps flexing roses, swords, naked women’—amplifies national and cultural oppositions. She counterpoises poetic forms, posing tight haiku alongside rangy villanelles. “

Devine’s novel, The Voices of Heaven, focuses on a polygamous family and their struggles during the Korean War and flows from her first-hand experience of growing up in Seoul during the war and its aftermath.  The story reveals realities of both the old and new Korea as the Confucian values that rule the characters still shape lives of people in North and South Korea. Devine and her husband, Michael J. Devine, the director of the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library in Independence, Missouri, often travel to Korea, where she works on her new project, Journals of Comfort Women, a book of poems about Korean comfort women who were forced to provide sexual services to Japanese soldiers during WWII.

The official website for Maija Rhee Devine

http://www.maijarheedevine.com/

Date March 5, 2014
The Kansas City Public Library
14 W. 10th St. 
Kansas City, MO, 64108

6:00 Reception 
6:30 Reading